Robert Bradford

Robert Bradford

I have just moved into my new home last week and I think its no strange feeling for most of you when you go back to the immense pile of stuff you have from childhood. You either reminisce about the relationship you have with these items, or you wonder why the hell they are still here and they really should be chucked away. Its exactly same feeling people get when they see Robert Bradford’s Plastic Toys Series. Kids enjoy it because they see things they recognize, associate with, and like; whereas adults either connect or they repel to the combination of things they find useful or completely useless. It all started when the UK artist himself was looking through his piles of old toys. He bonded, but also had an urge to regenerate the items as a compilation of things. All made of plastic, he was surprised to see that screws did not break nor crack most of the components, so he used that to construct the sculptures and it ends up being a fact that is also highlighted in his works.

I was hooked by the image of the Dachshund, because I used to own one but he has past away a few months ago. The connection between memories thus especially revealed to me, with the toys of childhood and the shape of it as something I grew up with. I suppose that might be why the artist chose to build a majority of this collection in shapes of dogs, a subject very strong in connotations with childhood, family, devotion, and faithfulness. Plus, its a dog in colours, what can be more attracting to all ages than that?

Robert Bradford

Robert Bradford